Undergrad eyes future in trading commodities

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Ms Chui Simin, 20, aspires to work as a trader in a commodities house, even though she says the number of female commodities traders in Asia has not been rising as quickly as in other parts of the world.
The Straits Times

SINGAPORE - Ms Chui Simin's investment journey got under way as a result of loss - the death of her maternal grandfather about a decade ago.

For many years, the family was not sure what to do with the $50,000 worth of shares he left behind in small and mid-sized stocks, as they knew little about investing.

Then Ms Chui enrolled at the Singapore Management University as a business student and picked up some investment knowledge at its student-run EYE investment club.

And so, last year, at the tender age of 19, she was able to solve the family's dilemma - and make her own stock trading debut.

"While settling my grandfather's shares, I created an account to trade as well, which allowed me to put what I'd learnt from the investment club to use," she said.

The eldest of three children had been interested in commodities trading since her primary school days while listening to stories from her dad and godfather, a family friend and oil trader, about their involvement in the oil industry.

Now 20, she is undeterred by the fact that this is one of the most male-dominated sectors of the financial sector.

"I benefited greatly under the mentorship of a female trader, who urged me not to lose hope," she said. The number of female commodities traders in Asia has not been rising as quickly as in other parts of the world, she said.

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